Category: Communication

open-forum-2016-graphic-facilitation-2Above you can see the gallery created by our scribes for this year’s Bank of England Future Forum. This is a major event that connects the Bank of England to the wider public. These illustrations are really important not only because they make the financial services easier to understand, but they also stay in the minds of the viewers longer than lengthy banking text. Where people might not bother to read a document, they will always look at a picture.

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The workplace of today spans different geographic locations and consists of a lively mix of people from various cultures, speaking many languages and following different social codes.

Even if everyone is fluent in English, business language is filled with nuances of meaning and is open to interpretation. For example, if a Brit says something “sounds interesting” he most likely means “I’m not that keen” but a German colleague may conclude that he is genuinely impressed.

There are countless anecdotes of words being misinterpreted and meanings altered and, as amusing as those stories are, retold over a cup of coffee, they can drive you crazy if you happen to lead a global team. “What you say can be magnified or minimalised based on your listener’s cultural context.” (Mayer)

Direct cultures

Erin Mayer highlights in her article on Harvard Business Network how different cultures communicate. The more direct ones use what is referred by linguists as upgraders – words that reinforce the statement, such as: this is totally unprofessional, your behaviour is absolutely wrong.

Less direct cultures

Other less direct cultures use downgraders, words that soften the criticism. For example: “We are not quite there yet”, when what you want to say is “We are nowhere near completing this”.

One can imagine all the humour and chaos created by people from direct and indirect cultures working together. Mayer gives the example of a German who almost loses his job because he misinterprets the suggestion by his British boss that he rethink the way he does something as a choice, whilst it’s more of an order along the lines “Change your behaviour right away or else”.

No one wants to be misunderstood. So how does one successfully communicate important strategies and content to an international team?

1. It´s helpful to know when to use downgraders and when upgraders.

2. Use of images can ensure that everyone is on the same page. Images support and clarify words and communicate on a universal level, transcending socio cultural differences.

Leading a global team visual scribing